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I passed my RD exam on September 8th and graduated from my Dietetic Internship the following week, which makes this post extremely overdue. I thought perhaps it was a little to late to write about it, but so much of this blog has been building up to me becoming an RD, and I finally have a little downtime today as I relax before the Marine Corps Marathon tomorrow. As usual, things have been very busy since I last posted in August, mostly relating to my new full-time job as a clinical dietitian at Montefiore medical center as well as fall semester classes (I will finally be done with my Master’s in May). After such an intense year in the internship and then cramming for the RD exam, I admit my motivation to study is on the lower side, but thankfully, getting straight A’s is no longer top priority now that I have my credentials.

Taking the RD exam was a terrifying experience; I was literally shaking the entire time. I hadn’t taken a standardized test since high school (that was a LONG time ago) and had never taken an adaptive computerized test, so I was pretty freaked out. I knew I couldn’t have studied any harder (I crammed extremely hard for two weeks, with a few weeks of on/off studying before that) and I also knew going into it that a lot of people felt like they were doing horribly and ended up passing without a problem. So I tried to stay calm, as much as that was possible. My mantra was something along the lines of “all I have to do is pass,” but believe me, I did not feel like I was passing! The questions seemed very different from all my test prep materials (Inman, MedPreps, RD in a flash) and I only knew the answer right off the bat for a handful of questions. For the rest, I was guessing between two (or more) answers, in many cases because the wording was so confusing. However, I will note to anyone reading this who is preparing to take the exam that many of my friends did not think it was as tricky as I did. More importantly, despite the emotional roller coaster, I still ended up passing with flying colors!

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Getting my score report was the best feeling ever – what a high. I also haven’t felt that relieved in a VERY long time. Finishing the internship in early August was great, but I knew I wouldn’t really feel like it was over until I earned my credentials. We are able to call ourselves Registered Dietitians (RD), or the recently added Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN). I am choosing RDN, although in the hospital, RD is more familiar and thus used more often.

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It worked out that my exam was scheduled right when my family had planned to visit, which made the post exam celebrations even more wonderful. I met them uptown at Alice’s tea cup and enjoyed a lovely high tea lunch, followed by a stroll around Central Park and an awesome dinner at one of my favorite restaurants, Mermaid Inn East Village, before having to run off to class (unfortunately it was my first class of the semester that day too).

I hadn’t yet started my new job yet the week of the exam (just medical clearance appointments and training sessions), so it was nice to have some time off to spend with my Mom, before the craziness started up again. The weather was gorgeous for most of the week and although it wasn’t the same as having actual time off for a real vacation, we had fun wandering around and eating our way through NYC. One of the things my mom and I did was make ice cream in my new ice cream maker. We used the NY Times Master ice cream recipe – we figured we would start nice and simple with vanilla. IT WAS AMAZING and although slightly time consuming (you have to make the base and then chill it before putting it in the machine), it was SO worth it. I put the ice cream in individual containers, some with almond butter in the middle, to help with portion control, because otherwise we would have eaten the entire batch in one sitting! I haven’t had time to make ice cream again but am definitely going to after the marathon – perhaps will try pumpkin to make it a bit more seasonal!

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Speaking of pumpkin, I made a great batch of pumpkin banana pecan whole wheat muffins a couple weeks ago. They made wonderful pre/post running snacks, perfect as E and I completed our last long training runs for the MCM. I loosely based the recipe on Kathy’s cinnamon pumpkin muffin recipe from Happy Healthy Life, using whole wheat pastry flour, a real egg and skim milk (so mine was not vegan), ripe mashed banana instead of applesauce, some pumpkin pie spice as well as cinnamon, pecans, a small handful of rolled oats and no frosting. I’m looking forward to baking more pumpkin goodies once I’m back in NYC!

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Now that you’ve read about E’s recent racing triumphs (which continue to blow me away – a half marathon PR two weeks after his first 50k?!), I suppose it’s time I share what I’ve been up to since Boston. I too ran the Brooklyn Half Marathon this past weekend. No PR for me – that wasn’t the goal – but I had an amazing time, which certainly was part of the goal! It was a great experience pacing E two years ago, but I really enjoyed running for myself this year.

The Brooklyn Half has really changed since 2012. The expo two years ago wasn’t memorable at all, while this year’s expo – or shall I say pre-party, as NYRR aptly called it – certainly was unique! It was a trek getting there, but with beautiful views it felt like an “urban hike” and was worth the effort. Definitely the hippest expo I’ve ever been to, with local food trucks/stands, a bar, DJ/live music, graffiti artists customizing racing shirts (also sporting a cooler design this year), a barber shop (?), coffee bar (with excellent baristas and coffee, of course), and prominently displayed Brooklyn Half hashtags (obviously), all overlooking Manhattan. A great celebration of Brooklyn before taking to the streets!

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The race is a LOT bigger now than it was in 2012, with over 25,000 finishers compared to around 14,000. And I thought it was crowded back then! The course essentially is a Brooklyn version of the NYC Half, with 7M of rolling hills in Prospect park followed by a flat and fast stretch on Ocean Ave towards the beach (sure beats finishing in downtown Manhattan). It was VERY crowded in the park, and I found it frustrating at times to navigate around everyone particularly at water stations (next time I’ll carry my own small bottle so I can save time), but once we left the park the roads opened up and it was easier to get into a groove. The boardwalk finish was beautiful but I echo E – not fun to sprint on. I was gunning it towards the finish once I saw the 400m sign but then hit a wall of runners on the tiny ramp onto the last stretch, and it was tough to regain my speed on the sandy, slippery surface of the boardwalk. I guess that’s the price to pay for the scenery!

I had a fantastic race, which was a pleasant surprise. I’ve been recovering fairly well post-Boston but lately my legs have felt unusually fatigued. I spend a lot of time on my feet each day and things have continued to be so busy on the school & internship front that I haven’t been able to prioritze my training nor my recovery/sleep for that matter (working on that). I’m in the middle of my 3-week Staff Relief rotation, which is the culmination of my clinical rotations that started in late January. I essentially cover for other RDs and thus am treated more like an entry level dietitian than a dietetic intern, which means that my preceptors push me to see an increasing number of patients in the same amount of time over the course of three weeks. The goal is to reach 10 – I am currently at 7 up from 4 – which may not sound like a lot but believe me, 7 feels hard right now. This push along with less hand holding is exactly what I need and I welcome the challenge, but it has been mentally and physically taxing. I’ve been getting home from the hospital feeling utterly exhausted, body aching. Going for an evening run at that point is the last thing I want to (or have time to) do, but I’ve managed to get out there and squeeze in some miles a few times a week, which usually makes me feel better (emotionally, at least).

I felt pretty miserable when I woke up at 3:45am to make and eat breakfast on race morning, but that changed to excitement once we got to the start. I was aiming to enjoy the race and get a good workout in; if I felt up for it, I planned to run around marathon effort in the park and then gradually speed up towards the finish. Turned out I felt quite strong! I still refrained from going full-out, sticking with a cautious just below marathon pace effort in the park, but when I still felt good at mile 7, I started to pick up the pace and was able to stay around my usual half marathon range. Only in the last mile did my hamstrings start to ache slightly, but otherwise I was extremely comfortable. The weather was awesome which helped – warm but not too hot (there was shade on a large part of the course too) with a lovely but not overpowering breeze. Made the insanely early morning start worthwhile, as the temps began to rise shortly after our finish!

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I ended up finishing in 1:42:03 (Garmin details here), which funny enough is only less than a minute slower than my NYC Half time with far less effort exerted and certainly less prep work done. The atmosphere at Coney Island was amazing. I found E shortly after I finished – since he finished only FOUR MINUTES after me (he’s catching up!!!!!) – and we headed to the post-race party at the stadium for a nap in the sunshine on our space blankets. It was glorious (SO much better than the way too crowded boardwalk two years ago) – with live music, food, great people watching, perfect blue skies…too early for beer but I had a nice buzz going from my runner’s high. Wasn’t too early for ice-cream though, which we got on the way to the subway!

We just barely squeezed ourself onto the Q train back to Manhattan. I felt bad for the non-runners on that train, pressed up against all of us who had just raced. The mixture of smells was extremely unpleasant and I was contributing to it, so I can only imagine how they felt! The fatigue began to set in by the end of that hour-long standing journey. A nice hot shower and crashing on the couch when we got home felt like heaven!

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I managed to make these quinoa pecan muffins (via NY Times recipes for health, pictured on the left) in the afternoon, which I hadn’t made for years. Super tasty, not too sweet and very wholesome! They make a great pre/post run snack, packed with protein, whole grains and healthy fats. We put a touch of jam or honey on ours to make it a bit sweeter, but on its own it would go great with a savory meal. I had some leftover quinoa and quinoa flour so I tried out another version today – this time adding ripe mashed banana, substituting almond milk for skim milk (which I add 1 tsp lemon juice to make “buttermilk”), and coconut oil for canola oil. Definitely preferred version number 2 (pictured on the right) – extremely moist and a touch sweeter from the banana! I ran out of pecans otherwise would have added them. The black specks btw are from the tricolor quinoa I used (ran out of normal). These freeze very well so I popped a bunch into the freezer for quick snacks in the coming weeks!

So another great Brooklyn half in the books – and the verdict is, it’s even better than it was in 2012.  I highly recommend this race and look forward to running it again next year!

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Sunday – I hope you’re enjoying the sunshine! Unfortunately, I’m stuck inside today studying for my written Food Science exam tomorrow (our cooking lab final exam is on Wednesday). As you can imagine, I’m seriously counting down the days until my last final on May 15th. I get an entire TWO weeks off from school (including a week in California to visit my family) before organic chemistry hell begins – so I’m very excited.

Over the course of the semester, I’ve noticed that I’ve left studying more and more to the last minute for each exam…kind of just started studying for this one yesterday…I’m sure it will be fine. Time to learn the fine art of cramming, given I have already mastered the art of procrastination. 🙂

Thankfully, I got to enjoy the slightly chilly but beautiful weather yesterday during my first long run outing to Prospect Park. I can’t believe it took me this long to run in Brooklyn! I wanted to check out the first 7M of the Brooklyn Half Marathon course and also just needed a break from Central Park. I am definitely going back – was a slightly longer journey but worth every extra minute. It was relatively quiet during our first few laps (my running buddy and I started nice and early), super green, had a different vibe that I liked and somehow the smaller loops made the miles go by quickly. I had feared doing four + loops would get really boring, but those 12 miles flew by! Maybe it was just the fact that we were in a new environment.

As for hills, I was trying to gauge if it was about the same as Central Park, so I could prepare E given he won’t have a chance to check out the course before May 19th. If you run counter-clockwise, there is one big hill that isn’t quite as steep as Harlem hill but it’s longer (about 0.4M). You run two loops, so you hit that hill twice. I think it probably ends up being about the same. I compared last week’s 11.25M Central Park run to yesterday’s 12M Prospect Park run – and they were both around 430ft elevation gain, and that was with us going out of our way to get more hills in yesterday (we did one loop in the opposite direction, which was a bit harder).

Lastly, I loved that we were able to end our run right at a farmer’s market. I always take the train back to Union Square after a Central Park run and get to hit the market there, but it’s not the same as finishing a run and immediately refueling with a coffee and some well-deserved goodies. It reminded me of being back in London and hitting Borough Market after a river run.

Wandering around farmer’s markets after a long run is dangerous though – I somehow managed to resist eating everything in sight, knowing I had another long day of cooking ahead of me. It hasn’t been the healthiest week, with bread and pastry classes as our last two labs, but it’s been fun! Here’s a shot of *some* of the baked goods we made (many were still in the oven when I took this, including my carrot-raisin muffins) – I don’t think I’ve ever eaten so many muffins, cookies and scones in one day. It’s a good thing I ran long on Saturday!

On Friday night, I did a huge shop at TJ’s to stock up on all kinds of things so that I could practice cooking for my Food Science final exam. I’m not sure if you’ve seen the show Chopped on the Food Network, but that’s essentially half of my exam. The first part is testing our knife skills, then the second part is testing us on three of the MANY techniques we’ve done, and lastly we get four secret ingredients and must turn it into a fabulous meal. Our professor, along with my Physiology professor, will serve as our panel of judges, walking around and tasting/critiquing everyone’s food. I’m surprisingly nervous – I love to cook, and I think I can make something good, but I am a relatively slow cook and I’m not a huge fan of the chaos in a busy kitchen. I would NOT survive as a professional chef, that’s for sure!

So, what have I practiced so far? On Thursday morning, I made poached eggs, which I placed on top of roasted sweet potato and onions. My eggs didn’t come out perfectly – I was using medium sized eggs so I didn’t have as much white as I would like – but I think I have the technique down. Friday night, I made quinoa, which was a bit challenging given I don’t have a lid for my pot, but a plate sufficed (kind of). I pan seared some chicken and attempted to make my first sauce – used white wine to deglaze and then added chicken stock. This is very simple, except that I was very tired after a long day (I had been up in the Bronx for a City Harvest training – which is going well btw!) and didn’t pour off the hot oil. So, of course I set off the smoke alarm and my sauce was a disaster. Thankfully, the chicken tasted great as did the roasted Brussels sprouts and fennel, and the braised fennel I had made earlier. For the sprouts, I did what my teacher told us and put aside a bunch of leaves, tossed them in some olive oil and salt and roasted them separately after the sprouts to incorporate some nice crispy leaves into the rest of the dish.

Yesterday’s menu included mushroom risotto, pan fried chicken and pan fried fish (I wanted to practice breading and pan frying things, as I never do this for myself), banana muffins, braised chicken legs and making sauce thickeners (roux and slurry). I didn’t get to the last two items, but everything else went quite well! For the risotto, I used a Lidia’s Italy recipe, although I used baby bella mushrooms and sauteed them after adding the onions and shallots. Super easy and so delicious – I can’t believe I haven’t made risotto before. My arm hurt from all the stirring though!

Making muffins was my food science experiment – I took an old recipe for “healthy” banana bread that I’ve used in the past and tried to improve it based on what I’ve learned in class. I won’t go into the science here, but as you surely know, each ingredient (sugar, fat, type of flour etc) plays a specific role in the outcome of a baked product, and you can’t randomly add ingredients as you can do (to an extent) in cooking.

Now that I am starting to understand the science behind it all, I looked at my old recipe and it didn’t really make sense – I don’t even know where I got it from, or if I made it up, to be honest. Why was I using more baking soda than powder? I never really understood the difference between the two until now, and it seems like it should be the other way around. Why water and not milk? Why was I using all whole-wheat flour? Surely to be healthier, but it leads to a different texture and volume than half whole wheat half white. Why egg whites and not whole eggs? So I thought I could play with the ratios and ingredients to make it better while also practicing the “muffin method” of mixing: sift your dry ingredients, in a separate bowl combine your wet ingredients, mix them together with a few strokes and then put them into your muffin pan and into the oven.

I’m not an experienced baker and don’t have many pieces of equipment in my apartment (like scales) so I still didn’t really know how much of each thing I should be using – for instance, if I was balancing the apple sauce and mashed banana with the appropriate amount of flour, sugar etc – but I tried to look at different recipes and the info in my textbook to make an educated guess. I made my own applesauce by slicing two granny smiths and cooking them with a little water and cinnamon, and added a dash of lemon juice at the end. SO GOOD and so easy. I removed the skins (and ate them – yum!) and added them to my two mashed ripe bananas. I used two medium eggs rather than three egg whites; two teaspoons baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda; one cup whole wheat and one cup white flour; 1/2 cup milk rather than water (kinda guessed on the amount – but wanted to try using milk); 1/2 teaspoon salt; about 1/3 cup chopped walnuts; and one teaspoon each of cinnamon and vanilla. Here’s the result:

So what was my verdict? The flavor was GREAT – definitely improved upon the old recipe (although to be fair, it really needed improving – tasted way too healthy). The egg yolks added some fat which made them more tender and added flavor, as did the milk; the white flour improved the texture/volume and together with the altered chemical leavener ratios, made the muffins less dense than my previous batches. They didn’t have any oil or butter though, and I’m not sure I got the dry to liquid ratio quite right – the were a *tiny* bit dry, so maybe I could’ve used a bit more milk or even lowfat rather than nonfat milk, or a little vegetable oil, but for a healthy muffin I was VERY pleased.

The other issue probably was from overmixing, which leads to too much gluten development and thus a tougher product. One of the important things about the muffin method is NOT mixing until the batter is smooth – a few lumps are okay – so you just mix until the dry ingredients are moistened. I struggled with this because I needed to mix quite a bit to get all the dry ingredients moistened, which perhaps means I didn’t have enough liquid. I know I overmixed because there were some holes in my muffin – otherwise known as tunneling. They also were a bit less tender than I had hoped, but overall the texture was good considering the ingredients. I had a few this morning for breakfast and they were delicious with my coffee – not sure they will stay fresh for very long though without any oil or butter, so I put most of them in the freezer for future snacks. Here are a couple photos – kind of looks like a smiley face, a kind of evil this-is-what-you-avoid-when-making-muffins face!

Right, well it’s now getting late and I still have hardly studied for my exam, so I better get to it!

Today is my first day back in the office, and (like many of you, I’m sure) I would rather be in bed right now than sitting at my desk with a mountain of work to do! Yuck. Thankfully, I am finally going on holiday later this month – only 18 more days and I will be sunbathing on a beach in Zanzibar for a week. This California girl desperately needs a break from winter, and also just a vacation, period!

I did many long weekends throughout the UK and Europe in 2010, but the only proper holiday I took (excluding the US) was my post-Paris marathon vacation in Spain, which turned out to be a marathon in itself! You all remember the fun surrounding the Icelandic volcano last April – that thing erupted just before I needed to fly back to London, and as a result, it took me five days and four trains to get home. Let’s just say it was not the relaxing vacation I had envisioned! So, with another big race coming up and a few more months of winter to go, this beach holiday is well-timed.

While I countdown the days until I start popping Malarone pills, I need to keep myself in good spirits, and one thing that always makes me happy is baking! Nothing beats the smell of something sweet and delicious in the oven – except eating what you bake once it’s finished!

What’s my favorite baking ingredient? Extra ripe bananas.


The banana, from my experience at least, seems to be the most prevalent (and easily digested) foods for runners. It’s one of the only things I can eat shortly before putting on my running shoes, and I always see them in mass quantities before and after races.

Loaded with carbohydrates, it’s no surprise that this fruit is great pre-run fuel – tastier than a sports gel, and far cheaper and easier to obtain, that’s for sure! As for post-run, bananas don’t contain much protein (only about 1g in a medium sized fruit), which is crucial to recovery in addition to carbohydrate, but they can certainly tie you over in a pinch!

Not a big banana fan? Sure, bananas are a bit boring on their own when compared to prettier fruits such as berries or more exotic fruits like mangos. But what other fruit is so cheap, readily available, versatile and delicious in hundreds of different contexts?

How about sliced with peanut-butter and honey on top of wholegrain toast, with a glass of milk? Or frozen, thrown into a blender along with Greek yogurt, agave syrup, cinnamon, vanilla extract, a splash of milk and a few walnuts? Or sliced on top of plain yogurt with berries, museli and honey? Or sliced and baked, drizzled with cinnamon and honey, and placed on top of wholegrain pancakes or waffles? Or (when extra ripe), mashed and added to oatmeal, cooked with milk, cinnamon and honey (that is my pre-race meal, minus the milk)? Or dried into crunchy chips or chewy slices? Or frozen and dipped in dark chocolate? Or baked into a cake or cookie?

Okay, I’m getting a bit carried away, but as you can see, the possibilities really are endless…Let’s not forget, however, one of my all-time favorites: Extra ripe bananas used to make banana bread or muffins. YUMMY!

I won’t deny that some of the most delicious versions are loaded with white sugar, butter, white flour and other things that make baked goods amazing. Nothing wrong with that, but I’m in training now so I’m craving something more nutritious. I’m looking for something that would not only be a delicious dessert but would also serve as a perfect pre- or post-run snack, leaving me satisfied without feeling like I just wiped away my efforts.

Is that too much to ask for from a muffin?

Nope – check out my Healthy Banana Walnut Muffin (or Bread) Recipe! It’s high in complex carbs, fiber, protein and healthy fats, without the oil, butter, egg yolks and white flour found in other recipes.

How can that taste good?!

Well you can’t compare these to muffins loaded with all kinds of unhealthy goodness (butter does make everything taste great, after all), but you won’t be disappointed and your body will thank you. Somehow these always turn out great and everyone always asks me for the recipe. The key is using VERY ripe bananas, and the walnuts/dark chocolate chips add some indulgence while also boosting nutritional value.  I often use this recipe to make banana bread, but recently I’ve been more into making muffins since they’re such a convenient snack and can be thrown into the freezer.

So without further ado, let’s bake some banana deliciousness!

Claire’s Healthy Banana Walnut Muffins (or Bread)

Enjoy!

It’s a holiday in the UK today and I’m relaxing at home, contemplating what I want to cook for dinner. After so many indulgences throughout the holidays, I want to make sure I eat a healthy, nutrient-dense meal to prepare my body for a big training week ahead!

So what’s on the menu? Quinoa salad!

Most of you have probably heard of quinoa by now. It’s the ultimate grain (technically it’s a seed) in that it is a complete protein source and is also packed with carbohydrates, dietary fiber, minerals including iron and vitamins. In other words, a great food for runners! It’s also, in my opinion at least, delicious, versatile, and relatively easy to prepare. I like to mix red and white varieties to give a bit more color to my recipes, although it doesn’t seem to change the flavor dramatically.

One of my favorite quinoa recipes is my Quinoa Herb Pomegranate Salad with Poached Shredded Chicken, which I have adapted from BBC Good Food, as well as the NY Times Recipes for Health (for the added shredded chicken). This recipe is delicious and extremely healthy, filled with vitamins, protein, healthy fats and anti-oxidants. It’s also a great opportunity to get creative, and is flexible enough to suit all dietary needs and preferences. You can use turkey, beef, tofu or shelled edamame rather than chicken, chop and add whatever additional vegetables you fancy, place a smaller portion of the quinoa salad atop a bed of lettuce for a lighter meal – it’s up to you!

I was in a massive veggie mood, so I went a bit nuts in the supermarket with my vegetable ingredients – cavolo nero (a type of kale), baby courgette, and chestnut mushrooms (which I sliced and steamed in the microwave); yellow and red bell peppers, celery, and cucumber (which I diced); carrots (which I peeled and shredded); and dried cranberries to add to the pomegranate seeds. I had some turkey breast in the freezer, so I swapped that for the chicken, and I grabbed some baby lettuce leaves to add even more green to my plate.

Here’s the end result – I’m not sure it can get any more nutrient packed than this, and it was absolutely delicious! This salad always tastes great as leftovers for a couple of days too.

I also love these Quinoa Pecan Muffins (another New York Times recipe), which are slightly labor intensive to make because you have to grind your own quinoa flour. However, they are worth the effort – slightly sweet, nutty and simply delicious, not to mention very healthy! I made them last week and they were a huge hit. There weren’t that many left after my flatmates and I attacked them fresh from the oven, but the ones that did remain were stored in the freezer and ended up being the perfect pre- and post-run snack and breakfast on the go!

Enjoy!

Welcome to FFR

Hi, I'm Claire! I’m a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (MS, RD, CDN) and a Road Runners Club of America certified coach. This is where I share my latest adventures in running, racing, food & travel! If you'd like to work with me, please visit my professional website, Eat for Endurance.

My PRs

Marathon (Chicago): 3:33:18
Boston Marathon: 3:36:14
Half-Marathon: 1:37:21
10M: 1:14:52
10k: 44:52

My latest photos

Grateful for quality time this week with my little pumpkin! 🎃😍 Happy Monday from California! I haven’t posted any running pics for a long time as I’ve been dealing with a hip injury for the last few months (and zero running for the last 5 weeks). 😓 I haven’t run a race, even a short one, in over a year - so different than how I imagined my postpartum running life to be. It makes me sad that I can’t run especially while in Santa Cruz, but I’m trying to stay active in different ways, be diligent about my PT, and remain positive even though the road to recovery feels endless at times. Yesterday, E and I went on a beautiful beach walk in the morning and then I did a hike with a friend and our babes in the afternoon, where I normally run in Nisene. I miss running but hopefully will get back to it soon, stronger than before! Baking “for the baby” tonight (so I say as I gobble up these delicious treats). Made mini pumpkin muffins (and a few mama sized ones), recipe adapted from @babyfoode. So easy to make - I added full fat Greek yogurt and almond butter to include some healthy fats. I think Arielle will love these - if for some crazy reason she doesn’t, more for me!! 😂 Nice work on tonight’s dinner, @trailz.io!! So good I’m going back for seconds. Veg bake with layers of eggplant, red onions, tomatoes, zucchini, ricotta, breadcrumbs, & spices with arugula on top. 👌🏻 Surprise package in the mail today! Thx @rxbar - stoked to try out the new gingerbread flavor. Speaking of, how on earth is it already the holiday season?!?! #rxbar Love @siggisdairy triple cream yogurts - perfect to satisfy a craving for something sweet and indulgent while providing 9g protein, relatively few calories (170), and calcium. The chocolate flavor was so delicious! #dailysiggis

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