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I have been meaning to write about running during pregnancy for a very long time, yet here I am – finally posting this at nearly 38 weeks pregnant!

Clearly a lot has happened since I ran the Big Sur Marathon last year. That was always the plan – run one last big race, and then attempt another far more challenging endurance event…PREGNANCY! We were fortunate enough to conceive right away, so I cruised from post-marathon recovery right into training for motherhood. We found out the good news shortly after an incredible trip to Hawaii, where we ran almost daily on the beach and had an epic trail running adventure down and around the Haleakala crater. I didn’t realize that I was 3 weeks pregnant at the time (if that even counts) and thoroughly enjoyed our 12 miles of running at altitude, hurling ourselves down the crater and across some of the most stunning and dramatic landscapes I have ever seen. It was my last blissfully ignorant running hurrah – before any of the now familiar pregnant running thoughts and concerns entered my mind. E captured the day quite well in his blog and I highly recommend hiking or running there if you find yourself in Maui – check it out!

Once I processed the initial shock and joy of discovering I was pregnant, one of my first thoughts was, “Wait – what about my running?!?!” I was averaging 30-40 miles per week pre-pregnancy, not training for anything in particular but trying to maintain my fitness after Big Sur for myself, and in case I wanted to squeeze in one last marathon or ultra over the summer. I couldn’t imagine not running. It is such an integral of my life – my “me time,” my release, a way I bond with my husband, and a large part of how I stay fit and healthy. I wanted to keep running as long as I could!

As a running coach, I knew the basics surrounding exercise during pregnancy, including:

  • Don’t start any new physical activities – unless it is something relatively gentle (i.e. if you weren’t active before, starting a walking routine is fine)
  • Limit or avoid sports that have a higher risk of injury/falling
  • Listen to your body and err on the side of caution if something doesn’t feel right – it’s just not worth the risk
  • Ensure adequate hydration/nutrition before, during and after exercise to maximize energy levels and recovery
  • Avoid exercising in heat or other potentially dangerous weather conditions (e.g. ice)
  • Most importantly, follow the advice that your doctor provides you that is specific to YOUR unique pregnancy!

Exercise, generally speaking, is without a doubt beneficial to mom and baby, assuming a healthy pregnancy. There is a great deal of research to support this, leading doctors to encourage most women to perform some type of physical activity for at least 30 minutes each day. But I was already very active – 30 min of walking doesn’t exactly cut it for me – and I couldn’t help but feel nervous, especially during the first trimester, so I wasn’t quite sure how to proceed. I knew that many women ran during pregnancy – some even finished marathons in their second and third trimesters – but there seemed to be conflicting information and opinions out there regarding distance and/or high intensity exercise. Could I continue with my previous mileage? What about long runs? What was safe for me and my baby? There wasn’t a whole lot of concrete information available on the topic.

I found myself doing a lot of googling and and blog reading about other women’s experiences. This of course did not substitute my need for individualized medical advice, and it’s important to note that every pregnancy is different, but it was reassuring and motivating to know that other runners were able to have healthy, successful pregnancies and stay in great shape without sacrificing their love of the sport. Did their running change and was it challenging at times to keep running? Of course! Was it worth it? Hell yeah! Did their successs mean that I would be able to run throughout my entire pregnancy? Definitely not. But I hoped I could and I am grateful my little one allowed me to run as long as I did, up until 36.5 weeks!

It also helped that I have a great OB who has been supportive of my running from day 1. With the thumbs up from her, I kept doing what I was doing, with some key adjustments that I have outlined below. My running obviously shifted as pregnancy progressed, but I pretty much followed these guidelines throughout, based on my experience as a coach and long-time runner, my own research on pregnant running, and my doctor’s advice specific to my exercise and medical history:

  • I approached training for childbirth as I would any important race. Preparing for birth (especially if you are planning for a natural one, as I am), is in many ways similar to training for a race. You have an overarching plan that includes all the physical and mental prep work to cross the finish line successfully, but have to take things day by day and adjust that plan as needed to get to that start line healthy.
  • I tried to stay flexible. If I felt particularly tired, queasy, or something didn’t feel right, I shortened my run, slowed down, took walk breaks, cross-trained, or took a rest day. As a side note, I didn’t wear a heart rate monitor  – keeping heart rate below a certain level for healthy pregnancies is old school advice – but simply paid attention to how I was feeling and adjusted my efforts accordingly.
  • Speed was no longer a priority – especially since pregnancy WILL slow you down eventually (for me, this happened later in my 2nd trimester). I cared more about CONSISTENT running. I still did some high intensity exercise to relieve stress and break up the monotony of easier efforts, but only when I felt strong and up until my third trimester, after which I kept things very low key.
  • I paid closer attention to the weather. I’m the type of runner who usually doesn’t get discouraged by a blizzard, downpour, or a hot summer day. That had to change! On extra hot days or if conditions were slippery, I adjusted the time of day that I went running, hit the treadmill, or did some indoor cross-training.
  • I was extremely careful about my running nutrition & hydration. I carried water if running for more than 4 miles, especially in warmer weather, and carried electrolytes/calories if running longer than 8 miles. I also made sure to have pre and post run snacks (always on my radar though, as a dietitian!).
  • I dedicated more time to strength training and lower impact cross-training, especially once my belly got bigger. Running became less comfortable for me around 34 weeks, at which point I started to run/walk and incorporate more spin classes and what I like to call, “Netflix & Elliptical.”
  • I bought a Road ID to wear in case something happened to me while I was running, especially for when I was alone. I also carried a credit card and if straying far from home, my phone (which I usually never carry), in case of emergencies.
  • I invested in a few key items of maternity exercise wear to stay comfortable as I got bigger. I was lucky in that I could keep wearing a lot of my normal gear until mid/late second trimester, as I already had some flowy and stretchy long tops, large running jackets, and some looser/stretchy shorts and pants. I did find a few things useful to buy, including a couple maternity tanks, a maternity long sleeve zip top, and a pair of maternity tights – all on sale from Old Navy and Gap. I splurged on my For Two Fitness “Running for Two” tank and long sleeve top, as they were too cute to resist!
  • I always ran within my comfort zone – and appreciate that this is different for everyone. For example, a half marathon during my second trimester seemed reasonable to me (I did the Staten Island Half at a slower but strong pace), as did running 12-15 miles with my husband on long slow run days during my 1st and 2nd trimesters, but I did not feel that longer distances were worth the risk. During my late second and early third trimesters, I was quite happy running 8-10M and 6-7M, respectively, as my “long” runs. Additionally, I felt solid running on technical trails up until my third trimester, as long as I ran with E and slowed down or walked particularly tricky sections. Our trail running adventures in Asheville, NC (check out E’s post here) at the start of my second trimester were particularly awesome!
  • I tried not to compare myself to other pregnant runners – what my body looked like, how much I was running, or anything else. Every pregnancy is different and the only important thing was to respect my own!
  • I always kept the “big picture” in mind – heathy mom and baby! Sure, I still had fitness goals – run/exercise consistently and as long as possible – but the ultimate goal always was to keep my baby safe. I’ll be honest, it was a bummer to miss a workout or cut things short because I wasn’t feeling well or my doctor wanted me to be extra cautious at times, but in pregnancy, it’s just not worth the risk.

I never sought to run a specific number of miles while pregnant, but when I realized that 1,000 was within my reach, it become the perfect goal to keep me motivated, especially whenever my running started to feel aimless. The last 50 miles were especially challenging, as I began to feel my increased weight and changes in my gait – a good chunk of those miles were walking – but I’m proud of myself for getting it done. As my doctor told me, my dedication to exercise helped maintain great blood flow to my baby and will likely lead to an easier labor! It also means that my return to running post-partum will not be *quite* so painful (although I know that it will still be pretty tough…).

My path to full-term pregnancy has not exactly been easy – without going into details, we have had many bumps in the road, and the process has been scary/overwhelming at times – but I am extremely grateful to have felt good for the most part and to have been able to stay so active. For the past week, I have only been walking because that is what feels best, but I walk every day for at least 30 minutes and at a good pace. I’m thinking of it as “tapering” for “race day” – I don’t get that same post-run high, but I still feel great afterwards. The finish line is within sight now and I cannot wait to meet my baby girl!

A quick note on training for natural birth – my husband and I enrolled in a birthing class that teaches the Bradley Method. It has been a huge time commitment (8 x 3hr sessions) but SO worthwhile. We knew very little about the birthing process pre-pregnancy and we feel so empowered and prepared now (as much as you can be, that is). E and I have always worked well as a team, often training side by side, exploring trails together, and pacing each other in marathons and ultras, so I knew that I wanted him to coach me through birth. The parallels between running a long race and birthing a baby naturally are actually quite astounding. I have been practicing various physical and mental exercises (e.g. kegels, squats, pelvic tilts, active labor positions, relaxation and visualization, breathing etc.) to help cope with labor pain, and also practicing E’s coaching techniques to make sure that they resonate with me. Kind of like strength training, structured running targeted at your race distance, mantras, and learning the art of pacing, right? Childbirth is not the same as running an ultra obviously, but having run for 12 hours and navigated the physical and mental highs and lows of that experience certainly gives me confidence that I can get through the many hours of labor and delivery!

If you’re interested in hearing more about my experience of running while pregnant, in addition to my coaching and nutrition advice for pregnant athletes, check out this podcast that I did with Jason Fitzgerald of Strength Running! We had such a great conversation on pregnancy exercise and I would love your feedback.

I’ll close out with a photo diary of my running and other exercise adventures while pregnant – check out the captions to see how far along I was. It’s amazing how much my body has changed, even if I haven’t gained as much weight as I thought I would (and believe me, I have been trying hard to gain more, especially in recent weeks). Then again, I have always been a small person and can’t imagine my belly being much bigger! It will be a long road to get my body and my fitness back post-birth, but I know I’ll get there eventually.

First trimester:

Second trimester:

Third trimester:

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Yesterday, I posted a healthy pizza recipe, but perhaps you’re not a pizza fan, have a gluten allergy/intolerance or want a lower calorie option. So I bring you egg or breakfast “pizza” – essentially like a frittata, with all the delicious possibilities of “toppings,” but without all the carbs.

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I use a silicon round baking dish, spray with non-stick cooking spray or grease with a little olive oil, put whatever veggies/other ingredients I want to use in the dish (pictured above – layer of fresh spinach, chopped mushrooms, shredded tuscan kale, sliced cherry tomatoes, shredded cheese, fresh dill), then pour in the eggs (today I used egg whites – it’s okay if the egg mixture is below the level of the veggies, just try to pour the egg evenly over the veggies so that they are coated), sprinkle with salt and pepper and pop in the oven (400 degrees F for ~20/25min, like with the pizza the center will take the longest to cook, should be firm but fluffy). Adjust the thickness/quantity of egg depending on if you’re cooking for 1 or 2 people.

Slice it up like a pizza and serve with a side of fruit salad for a nicely balanced breakfast (or lunch or dinner)! Each slice is also great topped with avocado slices and/or wrapped up in a whole wheat tortilla. Great Sunday morning meal to fuel my mid-day run – thank goodness it’s finally “warmed up” today to slightly above freezing!

Another week, another batch of granola!

It’s insanely cold this week in NYC, so I needed to add a little kick to this week’s recipe. It’s a twist on my ginger coconut granola – this time with slightly larger chunks of chopped uncrystallized ginger, which gives this recipe a more potent ginger flavor. The chunks are quite large and the chopped pieces are very sticky, but I discovered that if you massage them with a little coconut oil, they are easier to separate and intersperse throughout the other ingredients. The oil also allows the ginger to get a little crispy on the outside while remaining chewy on the inside when you bake it (although you will only get this texture once the granola cools).

I also used a wider variety of nuts/seeds (sunflower, pumpkin, flax, chopped pecans, sliced almonds) and coconut flakes. I kept the maple syrup, oats, cinnamon, vanilla and salt the same, but barely used any coconut oil this time (just a tiny splash in the maple syrup mixture). I think it’s my favorite version yet…even crunchier, spicier, bolder and more addictive! It’s also a bit closer to the version that I love from Borough Market (Mini Magoo).

Here are the before and after baking shots. You’ll know the granola is ready when the oats are nice and crispy and the coconut flakes are nicely browned (stir frequently to make sure they don’t burn). I made a larger batch today as I’m sending half of it to my sister in California – makes a great homemade “just because I love you” gift! I also included nutrition facts on this recipe (see below).

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Stay warm folks – E and I layered up big time and managed to knock out 14M for our Valentine’s Day long run yesterday, but with today’s sub-zero temps, I think it’s a lazy indoor day for us!

Ginger Coconut Granola (Version 2)

Ingredients

3 cups rolled oats
1/3 cup maple syrup
1 tsp coconut oil
1/3 cup pumpkin seeds
1/3 cup sunflower seeds
1/3 cup chopped pecans
1/2 cup sliced almonds
3/4 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
1/8 cup flax seeds
Generous pinch of salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup finely chopped uncrystallized candied ginger (lightly coat knife blade in oil to help with stickiness)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F
  2. Combine dry ingredients except for ginger in large bowl (use more or less of the various nuts/seeds as desired)
  3. Whisk together maple syrup, salt, vanilla and coconut oil in small bowl
  4. Pour wet into dry mixture and combine so that it is evenly distributed
  5. Massage chopped ginger pieces (which are likely stuck together) with a tiny bit of coconut oil using your fingers and separate pieces before adding to mixture
  6. Spread mixture onto parchment lined cookie sheet (or use foil brushed lightly w/ oil)
  7. Bake for 15 min, stir mixture, then bake for three 10 minute intervals in between stirring until oats are crunchy; if you see the coconut flakes browning but oats are not yet crunchy enough, you may want to stir every 5min to make sure it doesn’t burn
  8. Remove from oven and let cool completely
  9. Store in an airtight container

Yield: 6 cups granola

Serving size: 1/4 cup

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Okay, perhaps Granola Sunday isn’t a thing…but I seem to be in some sort of a homemade granola phase! I also am majorly procrastinating writing a paper, and what better way to do that than a nice LONG hot yoga class followed by some baking. Clearly, I’m a very productive procrastinator.

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My ginger coconut granola was so delicious (and sadly now eaten) that I wanted to try a different variation this week. I loved the kick of the ginger, but thought I’d go for something a bit more mellow. I settled on sliced almonds, chopped pecans and dried cranberries, along with vanilla and cinnamon. Like last time, I used maple syrup (only 1/4 cup, since I made a smaller batch), flax seeds, rolled oats and a splash of virgin coconut oil. It turned out great – both crunchy and chewy, lightly sweetened, and delicious with my morning greek yogurt. It’s a great source of fiber, whole grains, unsaturated fats, and calcium (from the almonds). Mixed into my yogurt, it helps to keep me full and sustain my energy levels throughout the morning (which I really need if I am ever going to write this paper…). Enjoy!

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Cranberry Nut Crunch Granola

Ingredients

2 cups rolled oats
1/8 cup flax seeds
1/3 cup sliced almonds
1/8 cup chopped pecans
1/4 cup chopped dried cranberries
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 cup maple syrup
1-2 tsp coconut oil
1 tsp vanilla
pinch salt

Directions

1. Preheat oven 325 degrees
2. Whisk together maple syrup, salt, vanilla and coconut oil in small bowl
3. Combine dry ingredients in large bowl
4. Pour wet into dry mixture and mix together so that it is evenly distributed
5. Spread mixture onto parchment lined cookie sheet (or use foil brushed lightly w/ oil)
6. Bake for 15 min, stir mixture, then bake for 2-3 10 minute intervals in between stirring until oats are crunchy (total cook time of ~45 minutes)
7. Remove from oven and let cool completely
8. Store in an airtight container

While I lived in London several years ago, I used to go to Borough market at least once or twice a week, as it was just a short walk from my flat off of Bermondsey street. I had my favorite vendors of course, but what I enjoyed most was wandering all around while sipping my Monmouth coffee and taking in all the sights, sounds and smells of the market, ideally before the hordes of tourists arrived and often after a long run along the Thames. It’s is one of the things about London that I miss the most, aside from all my favorite running routes along the river and in the parks. I like the Union Square Greenmarket, but it lacks the character, history and culinary diversity found in Borough Market.

It was a huge treat to find myself back in Borough market after a three year hiatus during my recent trip to Europe over the holidays. After a few days in Amsterdam and before heading to Paris, E and I spent a lovely, nostalgic week in London wandering everywhere and visiting all our old (mostly food-related) haunts. Whoever says London doesn’t have good food clearly doesn’t know where to go! Just a few of my favorites – pretty much any vendor in Borough Market, St. John’s Bread and Wine (best bread EVER + extremely English fare, Spitalfields), La Boca Dilupo (awesome Italian, Picadilly), The Garrison (cozy gastro pub on Bermondsey St, London Bridge), The Providores (great, casual tapas on ground floor, Marylebone High St), Metro Pizza (meter long insanely delicious pizza, Notting Hill and Battersea)…and SO many more.

Pizza shark, Metro Pizza (London) St John's Bread & Wine The Garrison

Borough market was beautifully renovated since I last visited. It felt great to be back, despite the pouring rain, especially because we were STARVING! We were staying in a hotel down the street (part of the nostalgia tour required staying in our old ‘hood, obviously) and had just finished a 90-minute hot yoga class at our old yoga studio near London Bridge.

Borough Market reunion Heavenly chorizo sandwich papardelle with tomatoes and mushrooms 

First stop was caffeine – my Monmouth cappuccino was delicious and as always, worth the long wait in line (rain never deters Monmouth coffee drinkers). Directly across from Monmouth is Brindisa, where we devoured a double chorizo sandwich with roasted red pepper and rocket (E was upset that I made us share one…but hey, we had a lot more food ahead of us). My favorite pasta vendor, La Tua Pasta, moved to a permanent covered location near the ostrich/rare meat vendor, around the corner from Brindisa. I used to buy their chestnut pappardelle every week to cook with roasted tomatoes, shitake mushrooms and white truffle oil (great pre-long run dinner), but since we didn’t have a kitchen, we got their cooked pumpkin tortelloni to eat there (delicious). We visited the Comte cheese stand (my favorite cheese of all time) and bought a big chunk to eat later on. The Tomato Stall was still there – their oak roasted tomatoes are like crack, SO good in pastas or paired with cheese. We got the garlic version to have with our cheese. Dessert was a Portuguese egg custard tart. I think we must have dropped 50 quid in less than 20 minutes (not to mention the calories ingested). It certainly is a pricey/dangerous market!

The Tomato Stall, Borough Market Portuguese egg custard tarts granola

One of our splurges was a massive bag of ginger granola by Mini Magoo. They have tons of different flavors and products (mostly low sugar/oil); this one is nice as its lightly sweetened, nice and crunchy with various seeds, tiny specs of ginger, whole almonds and dried coconut flakes. I love it in greek yogurt or with almond milk.

We somehow managed to resist opening the bag for the rest of our trip and brought it home to enjoy. Sadly, we just finished it and I wanted to see if I could create my own variation based on their ingredient list. I used maple syrup instead of agave, left out the whole almonds and coconut flakes, added a touch of coconut oil, added cinnamon and vanilla, and crystallized ginger chopped into the smallest pieces I could manage (I would love to know how they get their ginger pieces so tiny and crunchy, as mine were chewy and bigger).

Ginger coconut granola crunch crunch crunch close up

It tastes different but turned out great – crunchy, slightly sweetened, and full of whole grains, fiber, and healthy fats. It’s also gluten free and vegan (in case you care). I love it by itself, mixed with yogurt and fruit (+ almond butter, as I add that to everything), or simply with milk. The nice part about this recipe is that it’s extremely easy to make and can be adjusted to what you like – substitute different nuts/seeds, use different spices, substitute ginger for dried cranberries etc. I’m sure it would also work without the oil or with different sweeteners.

Oh and in case you’re wondering, we helped offset our two and a half weeks of complete gluttony with an average of 5-10 miles per day of walking to see the city sights plus 3-4 beautiful (COLD) runs around Amsterdam/London/Paris per week…THAT is how we do Europe! (I know – I’m a dietitian – but hey, we need vacations and love to enjoy our food too!)

Ginger coconut granola

Ingredients

3 cups rolled oats
1/3 cup maple syrup
1 tbsp coconut oil (In its liquid form)
1/4 cup pumpkin seeds
1/8 cup sunflower seeds
1/8 cup flax seeds
Pinch of salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 cup finely chopped crystallized ginger

Directions

1. Preheat oven 325
2. Whisk together maple syrup, salt and coconut oil in small bowl
3. Combine dry ingredients in large bowl
4. Pour wet into dry mixture and mix together so that it is evenly distributed
5. Spread mixture onto parchment lined cookie sheet (or use foil brushed lightly w/ oil)
6. Bake for 15 min, stir mixture, then bake for 2-3 10 minute intervals in between stirring until oats are crunchy (mine took a total cook time of ~45 minutes)
7. Remove from oven and let cool completely
8. Store in an airtight container

(Click here for printer friendly recipe)

To finish things off, a few more photos of our adventures in Europe!

Steaming hot pretzel in an Amsterdam night market  Pigeon graffiti, Amsterdam (?!)

Amsterdam  Beautiful Tower Bridge in all its glory Run!! East London  Chelsea Potter pub (where I met E)

Banana nutella crepe, Ile St Louis  The Mont Blanc at Angelina's in Paris

Le Penseur Playing with statues in Paris

Giant Lindor truffle Local memorial in residential Paris

Our award  Second place finish

After winning 1st place in the female relay division last year, team Dietitian Divas got automatic entry into this year’s race and set out to defend our title. We all joked that our highly competitive spirit didn’t quite match up to our training (or relative lack thereof), but we gave it our all and managed to get a team PR of 2:29:19, 2 min and 40 sec faster than last year. Go team!

photo 3  photo 2 photo 1

It was a very early morning. I forgot how painful it is to have to get to transition on west 72nd on the Hudson by 4:30 am and sit around (in the rain, this time) for 4 hours waiting for my teammates to do their parts before I have to spring into 10k mode.

Thankfully, the time went by fairly quickly, and the event was extremely well organized. Like last year, it was cool to be a part of such a different type of event and watch all the athletes, especially the pros. I can’t imagine doing the entire thing and have no desire to, so I’m glad I get the chance to participate as part of the relay. I loved the tri tats we got to put on this year – hand tats and MASSIVE arm tats. I felt badass – I wish we got these for marathons!

Here’s our team before the start, looking surprisingly awake at 5am:

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Most of the time we shaved off was thanks to our swimmer, who was 3 minutes faster compared to last year, as well as our cyclist, who was nearly a minute faster! I’m so proud of them – they really pushed hard.

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I was pumped to try to win again, but as I crossed 72nd street before mile 1, my legs were really feeling it. Not a good sign! I told myself that I would start pushing more later in the park to avoid blowing up, thrusting myself down the hills and really going for it after the halfway point. Picking off triathletes one by one gave me strength (I know, it’s not fair given I jumped in for the run, but it’s still exhilarating to pass so many people in such a short race). And when a one-armed guy flew past me at mile 5, that inspired me to push even harder. The finish was worse than I remembered – like a never ending maze that zig zagged all around the 72nd street transverse. I was so happy to hear the cheers of my teammates and friends near the finish to keep me going!

Unfortunately, I did not beat my time from last year – I was 1 min 24 sec slower, which is pretty spot on what I predicted to my team. I knew it wasn’t realistic to get a PR given that I’m in the middle of marathon training (and didn’t really taper) and am also slightly heavier than last year. I also had to stop to adjust my chip, which was too loose around my ankle at the start of the run, and we were about 10 sec slower during our transitions, so I guess it all adds up. I tried my best, and that’s what matters! Check out my Garmin details here.

When I found out that we missed 1st place by just 35 seconds, I couldn’t help but feel somewhat responsible for our second place finish despite our overall faster time given I was the only one that slowed down this year. But that’s okay – it was a faster field and we were extremely close to winning, so 2nd place certainly is something to celebrate! Perhaps more importantly, we beat the team that used to win every year until we beat them last year (they placed 2nd last year and 3rd this year), which made us happy (competitive much?!). I’m proud of our team for getting a PR and we were excited to once again get up on that podium. I know for me at least, it’s likely the only time I’ll ever be up on a major race stage receiving an award! It’s also a great feeling to be part of a team for once, in a sport that for me mostly involves racing solo.

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We had the same commentator, you said the same thing as last year when we accepted our award: “Dietitian Divas – that’s so New York.” Um…okay!

We had tons of time to kill in between our finish and the awards ceremony, so we hit up the finish area booths before grabbing brunch. I’ve never gotten so much swag in my life! Check out all the Clif products I got. I swear, I didn’t rob a running store! They kept dumping things into my bag! I’m not a huge fan of recovery drinks, powders, protein bars etc (I prefer REAL food after a run), but I am experimenting with new gels and other products for the Marine Corps Marathon, and given how expensive they are, I was very grateful for these goodies to try.

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Now that the triathlon is over, it’s back to marathon training (I’m about to enter my 5th week of training) and studying for the RD exam, which I started to do yesterday. I also have one more week left of my Community rotation – my last rotation of my Dietetic Internship at Montefiore. I can’t believe I’m nearly done – it’s been a tough year and I know I have many more challenges ahead, but finishing this internship and taking the RD exam (hopefully in early September) will be such a relief. I don’t think the internship will really feel over until I have my credentials and finally start working!

I’m looking forward to heading to CA later this month for a little break before the exam to see my family, relax, study a little, and mostly just escape NYC for the first time in over 7 months. I have my first 20 miler coming up, which I am grateful to be able to run along my favorite trails in Nisene Marks. I can’t wait to breathe in that fresh redwood air and run on my beautiful local beach. Visions of home will get me through this final stretch!

I love the Oakley Mini 10k – definitely one of my favorite NYRR races! This was my third time running it with one of my friends and I was excited to be back and experience once again everything the mini has to offer. However, I couldn’t help but feel a bit apprehensive last night when I picked up the following bib number on a very rainy Friday the 13th:

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I mean, really NYRR? You couldn’t have skipped that number?! 🙂

Thankfully, despite my ominous number, I had a great race today. Was it fast? No. I came in at 47:08, which makes this year my slowest yet (compared to 46:47 last year, and 45:58 the year before…wait a minute, I don’t like this trend!). But it was my first all out racing effort in a loooong time – without ANY hamstring pain I should add – and it was super fun!

As I wrote in my first mini race recap in 2012, the mini is inspiring and unique in so many ways. NYRR always gets an amazing elite field, which this year included Desi Linden back again plus Deena Kastor, Molly Huddle (who won and broke the 30-year standing national all-women’s 10k record by 1 second), Lauren Fleshman and many others. It’s the only race that I get to be right up front – able to actually see all those incredible women start the race – which is very cool. The pre-race speeches are awesome (especially since I get to be right next to the stage for once) – today, Mary Wittenberg got the crowd revved up as usual, Katherine Switzer (along with the other female founder of the race) got up on stage to share the history of the race since it started in 1972, which I always like to hear because I certainly cannot imagine a time without women running! Desi gave a quick speech as did one of the Boston survivors, who said some very moving words about the space between where you are and where you want to be. It was a great start to the morning!

It’s also a very useful training tool for me, as I’m usually in between training cycles (i.e. post Spring marathon, usually climbing out of my gluttonous lazy phase), and thus is a great barometer of where I stand as I begin to prepare for late summer (NYC triathlon) and fall racing (Bronx 10 and Marine Corps Marathon). Two years ago – the last time I was able to really race – it told me I was in good shape for the start of my Chicago training and sure enough, I went on to BQ.

Lastly, the mini is a fun opportunity to catch up with my friend and this year – unexpectedly – race with her! I’m usually faster but this year she’s been getting one PR after another and I apparently am getting slower, so the gap is closing! She took off at the start and normally I would let her go and catch her later, since I tend to start out slower and gradually speed up (at least this works great in longer distances), but today I decided that I couldn’t let her out of my sight. My legs were feeling pretty heavy and I knew I needed a little competition to spur me on! So it was interesting for once to take off and try to hold on. Not my usual strategy but for a shorter race I guess it’s not a bad one.

I finally caught her around mile 1 and told her, “You’re really giving me a run for my money!” From that point onwards, we ended up running within a few steps of each other. I could hardly keep up with her at times and I was pushing HARD. I hadn’t raced like that in a very long time – it was uncomfortable, and at times horrible, but also wonderful to get in touch with that feeling of hard work and that good (i.e. non injured) pain that goes along with it.

I looked at my watch during the first couple of miles but then didn’t bother. I was just trying to hang on and continue to carefully toe that line of racing but not blowing up. Around mile 5, I could tell she was struggling (I was too) and so I gave her some words of encouragement about how well she was doing. She said she didn’t think she was doing that great – so I told her, “Well, you have one mile to change that! Don’t let me beat you!” That seemed to get her going – and sure enough she got a PR. That last mile was brutal. She got ahead and I managed to pour every ounce of energy I had left into one final sprint so that we crossed the line at the same time. We both nearly fell over when we finished. I had no idea what time we got but thought surely that at that effort we must have finished in 45 something. Nope – 47:08! I couldn’t believe it. But I was happy. What a great combination of camaraderie and competition.

So this year, the mini revealed that I have a LOT of work to do before my next race on Aug 3. We’re defending champs of the women’s NYC triathlon relay and I can’t let my team down! It was warm and humid out, and I hadn’t rested much during the week (silly me, deciding to start strength training again a couple days before), so I’m sure that’s part of it. But mostly I just need to get back to the gym, hit the track more regularly, and get rid of those extra pounds I’m carrying. Time to get to work! I’ve started to keep a food journal just to get back into more mindful eating. It’s VERY time consuming (even with myfitnesspal), and I’m proud of myself for sticking with it for 6 days in a row. It’s really increased my awareness of my eating patterns and how I can make some positive changes to optimally fuel my body and help get myself back into racing shape.

As in previous years, I couldn’t leave the post-race festival without getting my medal signed. This time, I got Desi’s signature (as before) as well as Deena’s and Lauren’s, and got to chat with all of them about how they ran, upcoming races etc. Definitely a wonderful experience!

photo 4 photo 3

I made a killer whole wheat pizza packed with veggies as well as some chicken sausage and cheese for my post race meal. YUM. E had just gotten back from a 50 mile bike ride so we both happily stuffed our faces. Here’s the pizza before I popped it in the oven. I love Trader Joe’s dough!

photo 5

And now back to the books. I stupidly left some substantial projects for my Sports Nutrition class to the last minute (these summer courses really fly by) and thus tomorrow I’ll be in the library all day rather than enjoying the beautiful weather. I dream that someday I will be done with this program!! The good news is that I finished my clinical rotations last week and only have about 8 more weeks to go before I finish my Dietetic Internship and can take my RD exam. I won’t be truly finished until May 2015, but still…light at the end of the tunnel!

 

How’s everyone handling this incredibly hot, first official day of summer? I’m trying to convince myself that it’s easing me into the similarly high temperatures in Rome, where I’m spending the weekend, but there’s no easing into a sudden heat advisory, is there?! Although tomorrow is supposed to be even worse, so I suppose that’s progress…

Class today felt particularly draining – I couldn’t sleep last night, lab this morning was long and hot, my quiz was harder than I expected and then I spent a few hours taking practice exams to prepare for my orgo midterm tomorrow. By the time I headed back to Manhattan in the late afternoon the temperatures were starting to soar and I was completely fried, both mentally and physically. Needless to say, the last thing I wanted to do was go for a tempo run. I hate the dreadmill, but there was no way I was going to attempt a hard session outdoors. At least the gym had AC!

But what really motivated me to quit my whining and put on my running shoes, aside from the promise of AC, was this article written by one of my Gilda’s Club runners. Mary Beth, who is a journalist as well as a member of Gilda’s Club, asked me after our first meeting if I would be willing to talk to her about the rising popularity of marathoning for an article she was writing for Salon.com. The article would also discuss her own decision to run her first marathon after enduring a grueling phase-1 clinical trial for cancer treatment. I of course said yes!

We had a really lovely chat over the weekend, and I’m really pleased with how the article came out. Funny enough, one of the other coaches she interviewed is Patti Finke, who taught my RRCA coaching certification course. I agree with everything Patti says – I certainly don’t think anyone off the street can run a marathon, but if you train properly and you have the DETERMINATION, yes I think you can do it. It pains me just how many people go into marathons poorly prepared – I remember overhearing a man tell his friend at mile eight of the Portland Marathon that he was officially in unchartered territory, since he had never run more than eight miles. That’s NOT what I meant when I was talking about proving something to yourself! That’s just plain stupid.

I have faith in my runners and in my own ability to motivate them – that is why I 100% believe they CAN do it. But WILL they do it? That depends entirely on them – because at the end of the day, there’s only so much a coach can do! It all comes down to the individual runner. You have to have the desire, as well as the discipline – not only to train but also to respect your body. And of course there are always things out of our control that happen – injuries, stomach problems, or whatever else. But yes I know my runners can do it – and I’m going to do my best to help them actually do it. 🙂

After reading that article, what excuse could I really give to skip my run? I headed to the gym and although my run was pretty crappy, I’m glad I ran. It’s going to be a low mileage week with Rome so I have to front load my training this week as much as possible!

Time to pack for Rome and start studying for my midterm – 8pm already?! Yikes. My exam is mid-day and I head to the airport directly afterwards. Unfortunately I only have 48 hours in Italy, since I have to be back for class on Monday (and yet another exam shortly thereafter), but I’m excited. I am finally seeing E, celebrating the wedding of a dear friend and last but certainly not least, taking two entire days off of studying orgo – woo-hoo!

Happy Summer Solstice everyone – and be careful if you’re running outdoors!

I’m starting to think that the races I go into with relatively low or neutral expectations are often the great ones. Not to say that setting ambitious goals for yourself isn’t worthwhile – this is what I usually do, and it’s what led me to BQ in the NYC Marathon, for instance. However, my perfectionist tendency to put so much pressure on myself and over-analyze the journey to the finish can sometimes backfire rather than motivate me – it’s a fine line!

Take my very first half marathon, for instance – I had taken a week off due to a bad cold and didn’t really know what I was capable of achieving. Rather than plot out a detailed race strategy or obsess about pace bands, the gun went off and I just started running. By the second mile, I realized how strong I felt and gradually pushed harder and harder until I reached the finish. I ran a 1:37 and am still trying to beat that time! I trained hard for that race, but my ability to remain so focused and in tune with my body was equally important. Just run forward as fast as you can until you are done – it really felt that simple. And yet most of the time, for me, it never is that simple!

I didn’t break any personal bests at yesterday’s Mini 10k race, but I did exceed my expectations and had a fantastic race. I went into it utterly exhausted (I haven’t really slept much in the last two weeks – part insomnia, part organic chemistry), I didn’t feel like running, my stomach was upset and I wasn’t prepared for this race (I’ve done minimal speed work since March). Hence the low expectations! This race was supposed to be a diagnostic to assess my fitness level as I launch my Chicago marathon training, but my real goal was to improve my NYRR race “best pace” of 7:39 so that I could be placed in a higher corral going forward. It wasn’t a very lofty goal, given I normally run a 10k much faster, but I wasn’t sure I could even manage a 7:38.

  

My running buddy met me bright and early at Columbus Circle, where the race began. Racing is always more fun with friends! I decided to test my running skirt out in a race – figured wearing a mini skirt would be appropriate for the all-women’s “mini” 10k – and my skirt didn’t disappoint. I might have to buy another one…

The race started at 8am and we really lucked out – it was supposed to be a hot one and the sun was kind enough to hide behind clouds until later in the day. This was my first all-women race – I normally wouldn’t go out of my way to do an all-women race, but I loved it (minus the crazy long toilet lines – they definitely needed more toilets!). The course was challenging but awesome and being surrounded by so many women runners was inspiring. Without all the men in the way, I was right up front – I could see the elites (Desi Davila, Edna Kiplagat and many others)!

The beginning (running up Central Park West) was crowded and I was feeling pretty apathetic about the whole situation, but at some point during the first mile, my attitude shifted. I don’t know why. Maybe being surrounded by so many other female runners and feeling proud to be part of something much larger motivated me – or wearing my Claire tank, which I usually only save for big races – or looking at my watch at Mile 1 and seeing my 7:20 average pace. Whatever it was, something stirred within me and I felt that fighting spirit come back. “Slow down!” my brain yelled, but my body said “screw it” and kept pressing on. The roads opened up as we entered the park and I was able to get “into the zone.”

It’s really tough to toe that line successfully in terms of pushing as hard as you can without crashing and burning before the finish – but in a relatively short race, you can afford to be a bit more risky at the start and I decided to just go for it. The hills were a bit brutal, reflected in my slightly slower split at Mile 4, and I was losing a little steam in Mile 6, but I managed to keep up the momentum for the most part. The downhills felt incredible (why do so many people fail to use the downhills to their advantage?!) and I LOVED the fact that the last part of the race was similar to the NYC Marathon course, including the same finish (minus that horrible hill at the end – I could’ve done without that). It brought me back to how hard I was working at that stage of the marathon to reach my goal and motivated me to keep pushing.

Finally I reached the finish – it took me a long time to catch my breath. My official time was 45:58 – just 54 seconds shy of my 10k PR, which I ran on a flat course several years ago. I really left it all out there on the roads – it’s been awhile since I’ve pushed that hard, and I’m really proud of myself given my current fitness level. What a great starting point! I really am more of an endurance runner and usually don’t like 10k’s because they are so fast, but I was really happy crossing that finish line and it was actually really nice to be finished in 3/4 of an hour! I placed 287th out of 6,122 women overall and was 77th in my age group, 30-34, out of 1,146. My average pace was 7:25 – great news for my future NYRR corral placements. Here are my Garmin details.

This bodes very well for my Chicago training, assuming I can keep myself injury free. Clearly I have more speed in my legs than I previously believed – surely helped by the fact that I’ve trimmed down slightly since I raced my last 10k, over a year ago. My hamstring felt fine during the race, but it has occasionally felt a bit sore after workouts so I just need to keep up my strength training and be very mindful of how my body feels.

  

After the race, my friend and I enjoyed our popsicles and other post-race goodies and chilled out on the grass, stretching and listening to the live music. She got a PR so we were both really amped up.

  

We were about to leave when we noticed a crowd around one of the tents – turns out Edna Kiplagat (who won the race – she also won the NYC marathon the year I ran it) and Desi Davila were there signing medals and taking photos with fans. Awesome! I LOVE Desi so it was such an honor to meet her. I’m kind of obsessed with this photo. I couldn’t believe how tiny she is in person!

Both women signed my medal – Edna wrote “good job” and Desi wrote “Claire, run happy!” Best medal ever.

We finally left the race area and on our way out, we saw Desi running with her coach. They were speeding along, doing some cool-down miles presumably. I can’t wait to watch her run in the London Olympics!

I’m definitely doing this race again next year. Great course, great crowd and truly inspiring to see how far we’ve come in the last 40 years – GO WOMEN RUNNERS!!!!

How many of you take a multivitamin or other kinds of supplements to ensure you are meeting your body’s needs for vitamins, minerals and other substances? My guess is a fair number – whether it is to improve bone health, fight a cold, get your dose of omega-3 fatty acids, raise your iron levels, improve your performance in your upcoming race….or any of the other countless claims you’ll find on the back of a supplement bottle.

Source

Some of these claims are valid, supported by numerous scientific studies that have been published in reputable journals – others not so much. Will those B vitamins really give you energy, if they have no calories and you are already consuming enough from food? Are those daily mega doses of vitamin C really preventing you from getting a cold or are you just producing expensive urine? I’m not trying to knock supplements – they can be very useful (even essential) during pregnancy, for vegans and vegetarians, for calcium and iron supplementation in deficient individuals, and for all the people who do not have the time, energy or desire to think about what they are eating and whether or not they are meeting their dietary needs.

All I’m saying is that when it comes to supplements, it’s important to take what you read with a grain of salt and never think of supplementation as a substitute for certain foods (unless you do not eat that food in your diet). The goal should always be to meet your needs as much as you can through food because some things, like phytochemicals for example, can’t be bottled – well, they CAN but they won’t give you the same, or any, benefits. Obviously, if you do not eat certain things – such as animal products – you’ll probably benefit from taking supplements of certain vitamins that are predominantly found in animal sources, like some of the B vitamins. But if you eat a wide variety of nutritious foods, you can easily meet your needs through food alone.

In case you’re wondering why I’m writing about all this – I have my last midterm this afternoon for Nutrition & Health, covering protein, vitamins, water and minerals. As I mentioned at the end of last week’s post, I thought it might be helpful to do a quick rundown of the important vitamins and minerals to test your knowledge (and mine!) and perhaps introduce you to a few new pieces of information. I’m short on time so I’ll just review the vitamins today.

Vitamins

Vitamins are essential nutrients but differ from the macronutrients (carbohydrate, fat and protein) in that they are non-caloric and needed in very small amounts. Some vitamins are fat soluble – vitamins A, D, E and K – while others are water soluble – vitamin C and the B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, B12, B6, biotin and pantothenic acid). What does this mean? Simply that some are stored in the liver and fatty tissues (fat soluble) and thus do not need to be consumed as frequently, while others (water soluble) are readily excreted by the body and thus need to be consumed on a more regular basis. This also means that toxicity is more of a concern with fat soluble than water soluble vitamins because they can build up in your tissues (particularly the liver) – but most often this only occurs from over supplementation or chronic consumption of fortified foods.

The Fat-Soluble Vitamins

Vitamin A is predominantly known for its role in vision, as severe deficiency of vitamin A results in permanent blindness. Other roles include maintenance of healthy bones and teeth, regulation of gene expression (protein synthesis), maintenance of the cornea (the transparent outer front part of the eye), skin and mucous membranes (things like our digestive and respiratory tracts), and it also supports immune function. The most active form of vitamin A in the body is retinol, which is found in animal sources such as fortified milk and other dairy, liver (the richest source, since vitamin A is stored in the liver) and eggs.

Surely at some stage you’ve been told that carrots are good for your eyesight – that’s because the precursor for vitamin A is beta-carotene, which is found in plant sources such as sweet potato, apricots, carrots, mango and other fruits and vegetables within this yellow to red to orange color. The body does not use this form as efficiently (12 micrograms of beta-carotene is the equivalent of 1 microgram of retinol), but they are still great sources of vitamin A and have been linked with reduced cancer risk, perhaps because of the phytochemicals they contain. Spinach and fortified cereals are additional sources of vitamin A.

Vitamin D plays an important role (along with calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body) in maintaining bone health during growth and throughout life. Vitamin D may also help prevent chronic disease development, but research is ongoing in this area.

Vitamin D is one of the few vitamins that we can make ourselves, with the help of UVB sunlight. Sunlight transforms a cholesterol compound in the skin (one of the reasons why it is important to have cholesterol in our body!) into a vitamin D precursor, which is then absorbed into the blood and sent to the liver and kidneys to be converted into the active form of vitamin D. However, the goal is to obtain vitamin D from food as well – good sources include fortified milk, egg yolks, enriched cereals and fish products (salmon, canned tuna and cod liver oil, for example).

Vitamin E is best known as a powerful antioxidant. It protects the body against damage by free radicals, or highly reactive oxygen molecules formed during normal cell metabolism. Good sources include vegetable oils (fresh, raw oils like canola oil are best, since vitamin E is destroyed by heat, food processing and oxidation), green leafy vegetables, seeds and nuts, wheat germ and whole grain foods (lightly processed).

Vitamin K‘s main function is to help activate proteins involved in blood clotting. It also plays a role in bone health in that it assists in the synthesis of bone proteins, which bind minerals (calcium and phosphate) to bone. Like with vitamin D, our body can create vitamin K (our intestinal bacteria or healthy gut flora does this) so we are able to meet our needs both from food and from within our own body. The only rich animal food source is liver, while the richest plant sources are dark leafy greens (1/2 cup of dark leafy greens exceeds our daily needs). Other sources include oils, fortified cereals and grains, cabbage, cauliflower, soybeans, milk and eggs.

The Water Soluble Vitamins

Vitamin C is probably most well known for its role in supposedly fighting the common cold, in addition to preventing scurvy (which I believe we all learned about in grade school??). With regards to the latter, vitamin C maintains the connective tissues in the body, playing a critical role in the formation and maintenance of collagen (which is why without vitamin C, we see symptoms including bleeding gums and loose teeth, which indicate collagen breakdown – at least I remember reading about that when learning about scurvy many many years ago…). Vitamin C supports immune system function and protects against infection, and some research has shown that it may decrease the duration and severity of symptoms, but it hasn’t actually been shown that it prevents a cold. So when you pop those vitamin C pills, there’s probably more of a placebo effect going on, as well as a weak antihistamine effect if you’re taking large doses. Lastly, vitamin C acts as an antioxidant – in particular, it protects iron from oxidation in the intestine (and helps us absorb more iron from certain foods if eaten in the same meal) and helps conserve vitamin E, another antioxidant.

The best sources of vitamin C are fresh fruits and vegetables, such as citrus fruits, bell peppers and broccoli. Since it is water soluble and breaks down easily, try to cut your fruits and veggies right before you plan to eat them. Also be sure not to overcook your vegetables or steam them directly in water – use a steamer (or even the microwave) or blanch your veggies to retain their nutritional value.

The B Vitamins are a group of vitamins that play important roles in the metabolism of energy yielding nutrients (carbohydrates, fats and proteins), protein synthesis and cell synthesis, among other things. These are the vitamins that often require supplementation, particularly folate for pregnant women and B12 for vegetarians/vegans.

Thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), biotin and pantothenic acid all help release energy that is stored in the macronutrients – the first three in particular play important roles in energy metabolism, and are all found in fortified grain products. The latter two are usually not of great concern in terms of deficiency, as most people meet their required needs.

Thiamin is also found in moderate amounts in most nutritious food sources, including legumes, potato, lean pork chop and sunflower seeds, for instance. Riboflavin is present in dairy products (this is why milk is packaged in cartons rather than glass – because riboflavin is destroyed by light), eggs, and some meat and vegetable products. Niacin appears in many protein foods, including dairy, eggs and poultry, and it can also be converted within the body from one of our essential amino acids. Thus, if you are consuming enough protein, you are most likely meeting your niacin needs.

Folate is crucial in the synthesis of new cells (helps create DNA) and in normal protein metabolism, while vitamin B12 helps to maintain the sheaths that surround and protect our nerve fibers. Both vitamins work as a team to make red blood cells, and depend on one another for activation. Folate is usually taken as a supplement in the form of folic acid, which is more readily absorbed than folate, by pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects. Enriched grains are a good source of folate – this is actually why our grains are enriched! The defects occur in the first days or weeks of pregnancy, so it’s important for women to ensure they are meeting their folate needs before they get pregnant. Other food sources include green leafy vegetables, avocado, legumes and seeds. B12 is only found in foods of animal origin, so if you do not consume animal products, this is where a supplement is very useful.

Lastly, vitamin B6 plays an important role in protein metabolism, and helps to make hemoglobin for red blood cells (which is what carries the oxygen in our blood) and maintain blood glucose levels, among other things. It also helps with the conversion of the essential amino acid tryptophan to niacin – another example of how the B vitamins work together and depend upon one another. Animal proteins are the best source of B6, but you can also find it in beans, legumes, and any soy-based products.

And that concludes the vitamins! I probably lost your attention by now, but if not, hopefully you learned something. 🙂 Now it’s time to go test my knowledge – last midterm of the semester!

But first – a big shout out to all the Boston marathoners out there, including Kristy (Run the Long Road). Good luck with the heat today – stay safe and have an awesome race everyone!

As much as I’m bummed not to be running Boston today, I guess it was a blessing in disguise that I didn’t make the cut during registration. I’ve never run in this type of heat! Then again, I’d take Boston in any weather! 🙂 Really hoping I get lucky in Chicago and get a nice cool day!

Welcome to FFR

Hi, I'm Claire! I’m a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (MS, RD, CDN) and a Road Runners Club of America certified coach. This is where I share my latest adventures in running, racing, food & travel! If you'd like to work with me, please visit my professional website, Eat for Endurance.

My PRs

Marathon (Chicago): 3:33:18
Boston Marathon: 3:36:14
Half-Marathon: 1:37:21
10M: 1:14:52
10k: 44:52

My latest photos

Big bowl of healthy and mostly plant-based goodness after some mid-day strength training! Chopped kale (massaged with miso lemon vinaigrette), spinach, leftover roasted spiced cauliflower, sliced almonds, hemp seeds, black beans, feta & golden raisins. Don’t forget to register for tonight’s NYC Marathon event at @finishlinept tonight (link in bio), where I will be answering all of your nutrition questions! Having a plank off with the babe! 😂 #gameface #Repost @wellseek (@get_repost)
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Quality fuel means quality runs. 🙌🏃
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From micros to macros, it's important for endurance runners to cover all of your essential fueling needs. Let’s break down what’s needed and where to get it from with @eatforendurance #linkinbio #ExpertsWhoSeek Fueling an active morning (heading to the @crunchfitnesss #crunchgoespink event shortly) with this tasty, balanced breakfast! Ricotta and homemade blueberry compote (thanks leftover baby food!) and almond butter and banana on @shewolfbakery bread from the farmer's market. 👌🏻 This may not be much to look at, but was seriously tasty!! Sautéed two portobello mushrooms in olive oil and white miso paste (added an awesome flavor) and added a fried egg and a dollop of whole milk ricotta. Happy Friday! Who's running the @nycmarathon? @finishlinept is hosting a great event (register at link in bio), and I'll be on a panel of experts to answer all of your burning nutrition questions!

Join Finish Line Physical Therapy and Tailwind Endurance on Monday, October 23, as we welcome a panel of experts to discuss the ins, outs and secrets to success at the New York City Marathon. If you’re racing, you won’t want to miss this!

We’re assuming you’ve already gotten great advice from a coach about marathon training (“nothing new on race day,” right?). Now you need all of the inside-scoop, nitty-gritty details to have your best race at the New York City Marathon – and we’re here to give it to you! Join us for what promises to be a great night of discussion and insider knowledge on race weekend, event logistics and the race course.​

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